JULES VERNE

JULES VERNE

miércoles, 6 de abril de 2016

Ron Miller’s Discussions

  • As the person who created the Frank Reade website which you have linked to, and co-authored a book about Reade with Anina Bennett, I must point out that our work is fiction. We treat Reade in these works as if he had actually existed, but we adapt and repurpose the dime novels to create an original narrative that deals with issues that often went unexamined when the stories were originally published, such as imperialism. As historical fiction authors, we have our version of Luis Senarens doing things that never occurred, such as inspiring Verne and serving as the Reade family's biographer. Oh, and btw, Abraham Lincoln never really fought vampires.
    • The idea that Verne corresponded with Senarens and then went on to pirate many of Senarens' ideas was first popularized by Sam Moscowitz in Explorers of the Infinite (1963), where he expounded on it in considerable detail, and has been repeated as fact numerous times since (indeed, the story that Verne and Senarens corresponded goes back to at least the 1920s). The "fact" that Verne plagiarized Senarens can be found in several other websites (this one, to take one example) and books (such as The Prentice Hall Anthology of Science Fiction and Fantasy [2001]) so it is a little disingenuous to suggest that you invented it out of whole cloth for the purposes of your fictional history.
    • As the person who created the Frank Reade website which you have linked to, and co-authored a book about Reade with Anina Bennett, I must point out that our work is fiction. We treat Reade in these works as if he had actually existed, but we adapt and repurpose the dime novels to create an original narrative that deals with issues that often went unexamined when the stories were originally published, such as imperialism. As historical fiction authors, we have our version of Luis Senarens doing things that never occurred, such as inspiring Verne and serving as the Reade family's biographer. Oh, and btw, Abraham Lincoln never really fought vampires.
      • Maybe so, but you have a box on the opening page of your site that reads, in part:
        One year after Luis Senarens' story of the Steam Man Mark III, he received a letter of praise from French author Jules Verne. Luis's account had inspired him to write "The Steam House" (1880). Years later, the exploits of Frank Reade Jr.'s heilicopter airships (begining [sic] in 1883) inspired Verne to write the novel "Robur the Conquerer" (1886)—about a sort of airborne Captain Nemo, traveling the skies in a helicopter airship.
        Since this reiterates a theory first made popular by Sam Moscowitz inExplorers of the Infinite, there is no real indication that you didn't believe you were repeating something that was true.
      • Excellent article, Ron, excellent.
        I've often wondered why I didn't "get" Verne the way I do other authors of the same general era.
        Now, I'm going to actively seek out better translations, including yours.
        (I should have known better: After I asked around on Amazon for people's preferred Hugo translations, I went from "like" to "love" after obtaining them. Same thing with Dante, actually.)
        How do you feel about the Walter James Miller translations?
        Thanks for the insight, sir.
        • I think his 20K is great, but the fact that he modernized the language has always bothered me, with characters speaking in colloquial late-20th century English, for instance. I kind of like my Victorian novels to, well, sound a little Victorian.
          His From the Earth to the Moon is really good (though I quibbled with him about some of the notes when it came out! But those don't affect the text.)
          • Thanks for answering!
            I'm with you- I want my Victorians to stay "in character", so I'll skip that and keep looking...
            Of course, as far as 2oK goes, I'll just get yours!
        Publicar un comentario